Hepatitis C
Return To SinoMed Main
Information presented on this website is for educational purposes only.
Materials presented have not been evaluated by the U.S. Food & Drug Administration and are not meant as a replacement or substitute for professional medical diagnosis and treatment. Visitors are advised to seek professional medical care for any any disease or illness.
 


 

 

Articles by
Dr. Zhang
 
TCM and MCM Theory Related to Common Liver Disease Blood Test Markers

Low Dose Interferon Patient Experiment

Hepatitis A Prevention Reminder

Hepatitis: Causes of Pain in Liver Region 

The Need to Monitor Your Chronic Hepatitis

Liver Enzyme Fluctuation during Allergy Season 

What are the Serum Markers of Hepatitis B and What do They Mean?

Enterogenous Endotoxemia in Chronic Hepatitis–
Part 2

Enterogenous Endotoxemia in Chronic Hepatitis–
Part 1
 

Chronic Hepatitis and "Blood Activating and Stasis Expelling" (BASE) Therapy -
Part 2

Chronic Hepatitis and "Blood Activating and Stasis Expelling" (BASE) Therapy
Part 1

What Causes Gastrointestinal Bleeding in Cirrhotic Liver Disease

Dietary Support for Cirrhotic Liver Diseases

Ascites - A Complication of De-Compensated Liver Cirrhosis

Liver Cirrhosis - Portal Vein Hypertension Complications

Liver Cirrhosis Overview

PG-IFN and Ribavirin Treatments

Antibiotics and Chronic Liver Diseases

Why is Alcohol Harmful for People with Hepatitis?

Co-infections and Super-infections of Viral Hepatitis

Beware of Medications That Can Cause Liver Damage

Bile Retention and Its Clinical Manifestations (MCM) part 4

Modern Chinese Medicine (MCM) Part 3 
Jaundice and Chronic Viral Hepatitis

Modern Chinese Medicine (MCM) Anti-Liver-Fibrosis Treatments - Part 2

Modern Chinese Medicine (MCM) Anti-Liver-Fibrosis Treatments - Part 1

What is Liver Fibrosis and How is It Different from Cirrhosis?

How does the liver change as we get older?

How is that my LFTs are so good when my viral load is seemly so high?

Comprehensive Care for Chronic Viral Hepatitis

What can Cause Liver Inflammation?  

What Are the Major Functions that the Liver Carries?


 





Antibiotics and Chronic Liver Diseases

Chronic hepatitis patients sometimes need to use antibiotics for unrelated infections and various surgical and dental procedures. Many are not sure about the possible harmful effects some antibiotics may cause their liver so I will try to provide a general guide here. 

  The liver has very complicated functions and one of the most important is the detoxification of drugs such as antibiotics and its metabolites. Some antibiotics can cause allergic reactions while others can cause direct damage to their liver, which can be quite severe in patients with chronic liver disease. For patients with a pre-existing liver disorder, the detoxification function of the liver is already compromised and substances that would normally be metabolized could actually accumulate in the liver or in the bloodstream. Antibiotics that accumulate in this manner could become toxic to the body and its functions can change drastically from its original purpose.

  The following is a list of the most common antibiotics groups being used today. Each is ordered according to their potential harmful effects on the liver, the top group being the most potentially harmful and the last group being the least.


1. Tetracycline family

The following antibiotics belong to this family: Tetracycline, Minocylinum, Guamecycline, Oxytetracycline, Doxycyline, Methacycline, and Demethylchlortetracycline. When used in larger doses, antibiotics in this family can cause jaundice, fever, and fatty liver. Hepatitis patients should be very wary of this group and alert their doctor immediately of their liver condition and ask for substitutes.


2. Erythromycin family

The following antibiotics belong to this family: Erythromycin, Erythromycin Estotate, Erythromycin ethylsuccinate.  These antibiotics can cause damage to the liver via cholestasis (bile retention) and jaundice. The harmful effects usually start to show after 10 to 14 days’ use and the incidence rate is approximately 5 to 10%. Clinically, patients may experience stomachache, nausea, vomiting, jaundice, and elevation of liver enzymes. These conditions are often considered allergic reactions since the incidence rate is not very high.

3. Chloramphenicolum family.

The following antibiotics belong to this family: Chloramphenicolum, Chloramphenicol Palmitate, Thiamphenicol and Chloramphenicoli Succinas. When metabolized in the liver, they combined with glucoronic acid and lose their anti-microbial effects. This combination of antibiotics and glucoronic acid can accumulate in the bloodstream, which can cause bone marrow inhibition. As a result, WBC and RBC counts can drop and patients with hepatitis should try to avoid this group if they can.


4. Penicillin family.

The following antibiotics belong to this family: Benzylpenicillin, Benzathine penicillin, Phenoxymethylpenicillin, Oxacillin Sodium, Cloxacillin, Dicloxacillin, Ampicillin Sodium, Ampicloxacillin sodium, Pvampicillin, Amoxicillin, Carbenicillin sodium, Talampicillin, Furbenicillin, Mecillinam, Carindacillin sodium, Ticarcillin. These antibiotics cause the least liver damage and only patients who are allergic may experience some side effects. Generally, antibiotics in the penicillin family are the most “liver friendly” and safe for chronic hepatitis patients to use.
 
For chronic hepatitis patients who need a substitute and patients who need long-term antibiotics treatment for Lyme disease or other infections, herbal anti-microbial agents can be used. Our most effective herbal solutions for infections are: Allicin Capsule, Coptis Capsule, HH Capsule, and Rhubarbin Tablet.

 

 

Return Home
About HCV
Overview
Causes and Transmission

 
Diagnostic Tests
Antibody
HCV RIBA
HCV RNA 
Viral Load

Viral Genotyping

 
Major Signs
Liver Inflammation
Fibrosis
Cirrhosis

 
Peripheral Signs and Symptoms
Fatigue
Jaundice
Bile Retention
Joint Pains and Skin Rashes
Blood Sugar Instability
Portal Vein Hypertension
Ascites

 
Important Liver Function Test Markers
Overview
ALT and AST
ALP and GGT
Albumin
Bilirubin
PT (Prothrombin Time)
 
Liver Biopsy
Overview
Procedure
Inflammation Grade
Fibrosis Stage
 
Interferon Based Treatment
Overview
Ideal Candidate
Possible Side-effects
 
Liver Support with TCM
Overview
Liver Enzymes
Serum Albumin
Blood Clotting Factors
Bile metabolism
GGT
 
Dietary Considerations
Overview
Proteins
Essential Fats
Carbohydrates
Vitamins
 
 

 


 

 

Medical Information Sources:
http://www.nih.gov/
http://www.nlm.nih.gov/

http://nccam.nih.gov/
http://www.medlineplus.org/


Contact the Webmaster

Copyright © 2005 Sinomed Research Institute®